Countless trucks crisscross the south every day, so you probably didn’t take much notice of each one. You may have never glanced over a truck before your accident, but it’s hard not to take a closer look at what factors might have caused the wreck now.

Trucking accidents rarely spring from a single cause. More likely, several factors combine when a large truck is involved in a wreck, according to a study by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Manufacturing defects, truck condition and driver fatigue were among some of the main causes for truckers colliding with others.

Shipping negligence

There are many ways negligence can land on the truck, but not the trucker:

  • Manufacturing: When companies deliver parts that don’t meet reasonable expectations, then it’s hard to expect a truck driver to handle the vehicle. Defective parts shouldn’t leave the factory floor, yet brakes, steering controls and couplers are just some of the places faulty production can prove deadly.
  • Maintenance: Even when parts show up as they should, the brutal nature of shipping across the country means those parts won’t stay pristine for long. Federal regulations spell out very specific schedules for checking and maintaining elements of each truck, from engines down to wiper blades.
  • Managing: Fatigue can be deadly when it comes to big rigs, which is why the FMCSA heavily polices operating windows and down-time. Not only do companies need to make sure that their drivers aren’t putting others in danger by pushing them too hard, but they also need to monitor it through trackers and logs.

Finding where the fault lies in a trucking accident can be tricky, but knowing where to look is a good place to start. Get the compensation you deserve after an accident by looking for a cause beyond the accident.